Tag Archives: recipes

Vegetarian Super Foods of the Caribbean ~ Part 3

Eddoes, Dasheen and Yams

Eddoe or Eddo is a tropical vegetable, a variety of Colocasia esculenta, closely related to taro (dasheen), that is primarily used for its thickened stems (corms).[1][2] It has smaller corms than taro, and in all but the best cultivars there is an acrid taste that requires careful cooking.[1] The young leaves can also be cooked and eaten, but (unlike taro) they have a somewhat acrid taste.[1]

Eddoes appear to have been developed as a crop in China and Japan and introduced from there to the West Indies where they are sometimes called “Chinese eddoes”.[1] They grow best in rich loam soil with good drainage, but they can be grown in poorer soil, in drier climates, and in cooler temperatures than Taro.[1]

Eddoes are also called malangas in Spanish-speaking areas, but that name is also used for other plants of the Araceae family, including tannia (Xanthosoma spp.).[1] Eddoe is known as arvi or arbi in Urdu and Hindi and kochur mukhi in Bangla languages in South Asia. And chembb or Chembu in Malayalam.

Eddoes make part of the generic classification cará or inhame of the Portuguese language that, aside taro, also includes root vegetables of the genera Alocasia and Dioscorea. They are the most commonly eaten inhames/carás in the states of São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Espírito Santo, as well as surrounding regions of all.[3] They are also fairly common in Northeastern Brazil, where they might be called batata (literally “potato”), but less so than true yams of the genus Colocasia. According to Brazilian folk knowledge, the eddoes most appropriate to be cooked are those that are more deeply pink, or at least pinkish lavender, in the area where the leaves were cut. (Wiki)

Eddoes is one of my favourite ground provisions. Nutty and wild in flavour it is ideal served with a variety of accompaniments.

eddoes-steamed-under-pressure   eddoes1 ???????????????????????????????

Dasheen

Taro /ˈtɑr/ is a common name for the corms and tubers of several plants in the Araceae family. Of these, Colocasia esculenta is the most widely cultivated and the subject of this article. More specifically, this article describes the “dasheen” form of taro; another variety of taro is known as eddoe.

Taro is native to Southern India and Southeast Asia.[2] It is a perennial, tropical plant primarily grown as a root vegetable for its edible starchy corm, and as a leaf vegetable. It is a food staple in African, Oceanic and South Indian cultures and is believed to have been one of the earliest cultivated plants.[3] Colocasia is thought to have originated in the Indo-Malayan region, perhaps in eastern India and Bangladesh, and spread eastward into Southeast Asia, eastern Asia, and the Pacific islands; westward to Egypt and the eastern Mediterranean; and then southward and westward from there into East Africa and West Africa, whence it spread to the Caribbean and Americas. It is known by many local names and often referred to as “elephant ears” when grown as an ornamental plant. (Wiki)

dasheen   Yam

Above you can see a photo of what the dasheen plant looks like above ground and the tubers themselves. In this clip Chris from CarribeanPot shows us how to cook dasheen or taro.

Here is a typical dish of ground provisions, salted cod, plantain, dasheen bush spinackh and a johnny bake. Dasheen bush spinach are the leaves of the dasheen plant that grows above ground. It is used to make callaloo and can be fried with onions and peppers just as you would spinach to make a delicious accompaniment.

daddy breakfast

Here Chris shows you how to cook dasheen bush bhaji (Indian word for spinach)

Yams

Yams are widely used by many communities, African, Caribbean and soul-food cooking of the South in America. Here is a link to a variety of recipes that use yams to suit a variety of tastes. Be adventurous try our ground provisions. They make excellent meals and are a great carbohydrate supplement.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/yam

382580     molasses-yams

http://allrecipes.com/recipes/fruits-and-vegetables/vegetables/yams/

Enjoy these recipes from allrecipes…

 

 

 

Vegetarian Super Foods Of the Caribbean 2

Cassava

File:Manihot esculenta - Köhler–s Medizinal-Pflanzen-090.jpg

Cassava (Manihot esculenta), is also called manioc, yuca, balinghoy, mogo, mandioca, kamoteng kahoy, tapioca-root (predominantly in India) and manioc root, a woody shrub of the Euphorbiaceae (spurge) family native to South America, is extensively cultivated as an annual crop in tropical and subtropical regions for its edible starchy tuberous root, a major source of carbohydrates. It differs from the similarly spelled yucca, an unrelated fruit-bearing shrub in the Asparagaceae family. Cassava, when dried to a powdery (or pearly) extract, is called tapioca; its fermented, flaky version is named garri.

File:Manihot esculenta 001.jpg

Cassava is the third largest source of food carbohydrates in the tropics, after rice and maize.[1][2] Cassava is a major staple food in the developing world, providing a basic diet for over half a billion people.[3] It is one of the most drought tolerant crops, capable of growing on marginal soils. Nigeria is the world’s largest producer of cassava, while Thailand is the largest exporting country of dried cassava.

Cassava root is a good source of carbohydrates, but a poor source of protein. A diet consisting predominantly of cassava root can cause protein-energy malnutrition.[4]

Cassava is classified as sweet or bitter. Like other roots and tubers, cassava contains antinutritional factors and toxins.[5] It must be properly prepared before consumption. Improper preparation of cassava can leave enough residual cyanide to cause acute cyanide intoxication and goiters, and may even cause ataxia or partial paralysis.[6] Nevertheless, farmers often prefer the bitter varieties because they deter pests, animals, and thieves.[7] The more toxic varieties of cassava are a fall-back resource (a “food security crop”) in times of famine in some places. (WIKI)

trinidad-cassava-recipe-1  Cassava and Saltfish Pie

Above two photos of the traditional cassava and salt-fish buljol and cassava and salt-fish pie. Cassava is a melt in your mouth experience with a sweet, nutty flavour, and despite it’s “dark-side”, remains a safe carbohydrate source in many cultures. Traditionally prepared with fried salted cod or in a buljol which is a salted cod salad. It is also excellent in soups and can be served with meat and fish stews, however personally eaten hot with a knob of butter, is just heavenly! Cassava is also used in sweet dishes in the Caribbean, and similar dishes I have found in the Phillipines and Vietnam. In the Caribbean they are called pone, which is a cassava cake and pamee, a steamed cassava paste in a banana leaf.

cassava-pone-12  cassava-suman-recipe

Here are some wonderful new ways of serving cassava from Conde Nast:

http://parade.condenast.com/156299/ericadinho/10-sweet-and-savory-yuca-recipes/

Caribbeanpot provides two lovely recipes for you to enjoy!

Have a read:

http://caribbeanpot.com/tag/caribbean-cassava-recipes/

Next Yams and Eddoes….

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rum ~Liquid gold of the Caribbean II

These are some of the wonderful rums being produced in Trinidad and Tobago today.

1919angostura-1824-12-

These rums are best served neat, or on ice. Some very traditional Caribbean chasers are water, coca-cola, and coconut-water.

Rum1rumoniceRum-TAsting

Chasers:

Personally I love rum and coconut-water and if you haven’t tried it yet then I suggest you do. Getting fresh coconuts is difficult but you cannot replicate that taste in artificial drinks. In London this brand Vita Coco is the closest I found to good tasting coconut water, and can be bought at Morrisons.

coconut-water-2                                                 Coconut water

Rum Punch

One of the most delicious drinks is a rum punch. As Chris says you can play around with this recipe but let’s start with a traditional recipe. The most important ingredient is the rum and your choice of rum will determine the quality and taste of your rum punch.

Rum Punch ~ Putting it together…

This recipe is beautifully done as you can see they’ve used a St Croix rum. My only change would be to use Malibu insted of the coconut cream.

INGREDIENTS (Serves 4): 1.5 cups of rum, .5 cups of orange juice, 1.5 cups of pineapple juice, 3 tablespoons of cream of coconut, .5 cups of freshly squeezed lime juice, 1.5 cups of grenadine

[In this video, we DOUBLED all of the above to serve 8.]

INSTRUCTIONS: mix all ingredients except for grenadine. Pour a small amount of grenadine into a cup filled with ice. Add rum mix. Enjoy!

At Christmas time there is nothing more enjoyable than punche-creme or rum flavoured eggnog:

http://blog.seasonwithspice.com/2011/12/ceylon-cinnamon-nutmeg-eggnog-recipe.html

Enjoy these recipes!

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/trinidads-ponche-de-creme-punch-with-cream/

Roti ~ Love from Our Indian Community

Origins of Roti in Trinidad and Tobago:

Roti

Roti is generally an Indian bread, made from stoneground wholemeal flour, traditionally known as atta flour, that originated and is consumed in India, Pakistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh. It is also consumed in parts of South Africa, the southern Caribbean, particularly in Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana, and Suriname, and Fiji. Its defining characteristic is that it is unleavened. Indian naan bread, by contrast, is a yeast-leavened bread. (Wiki)

Gary Rhodes Recipe for Roti:

Potato-roti6

http://uktv.co.uk/food/recipe/aid/613962

Various types of roti, are integral to Indian and Pakistani cuisine.[2][3]

* Sada Roti: Similar to naan. It is cooked on a tava, therefore the bottom is not crisp like that of a naan. Because it is the easiest one to make, it is the most commonly consumed roti in Trinidad. It is a popular breakfast option in Trinidad, in combination with tomato choka, baigan choka (aubergine/eggplant/melongene), and other vegetable dishes.

* Paratha Roti: A roti made with butter, usually ghee. It is cooked on a tava. Oil is rubbed on both sides, then it is fried. This gives the roti a crisp outside. When it almost finished cooking, the cook begins to beat the roti while it is on the tava, causing it to crumble. It is also called ‘Buss-Up-Shut’ because it resembles a ‘burst up shirt’.

* Dosti Roti: A roti where two layers are rolled out together and cooked on the tava. It is also rubbed with oil while cooking. It is called dosti roti because the word dosti means friendship in Hindi. This type of roti is not made in Guyana.

* Dhalpuri: A roti with a stuffing of ground yellow split peas, cumin (geera), garlic, and pepper. The split peas are boiled until they are al dente and then ground in a mill. The cumin is toasted until black and also ground. The stuffing is pushed into the roti dough, and sealed. When rolled flat, the filling is distributed within the roti. It is cooked on the tava and rubbed with oil for ease of cooking. This is the most popular roti. Another version of this is aloopuri, which is made from potatoes.

Check out this wonderful device for making rotis!