Spices of the Caribbean I ~Pepper Sauce

Peppersorangeredgreenyellowblackhot

Ah feelin hot, hot, hot!!

One of the main ingredients to spicing up West Indian food is the pepper sauce. Here is a basic recipe to get you going. Remember peppers/ chillis are very hot so protect your hands, and do not rub eyes, face etc after handling peppers.

Here are some of the peppers of the Caribbean…

  • Scotch Bonnet

  • These peppers are used to flavour many different dishes and cuisines worldwide and are often used in hot sauces and condiments. The Scotch bonnet has a sweeter flavour and stouter shape, distinct from its habanero cousin with which it is often confused, and gives jerk dishes (pork/chicken) and other Caribbean dishes their unique flavour. Scotch bonnets are mostly used in West African, Grenadian, Trinidadian, Jamaican, Barbadian, Guyanese, Surinamese, Haitian and Caymanian cuisine and pepper sauces, though they often show up in other Caribbean recipes.
  • Fresh, ripe scotch bonnets change from green to colours ranging from yellow to scarlet red. Ripe peppers are prepared for cooking by those who cannot handle the sharp heat by cutting out the area around the seeds inside the fruit, which holds most of the heat. The seeds can be saved for cultivation or other culinary uses.
  • Scorpion Pepper

Image

  • The Trinidad Scorpion Butch T variety pepper was for a short amount of time ranked as the most pungent (“hot”) pepper in the world, according to Guinness World Records in 2011.[4][5] A laboratory test conducted in March 2011 measured a specimen of Scorpions at 1,463,700 Scoville heat units, officially ranking it the hottest pepper in the world at that time.[6] The pungency of a species of chili pepper can vary by up to a factor of 10 depending on the conditions under which the specimen grew. The secret to the heat, according to the creators, is fertilizing the soil with liquid runoff of a worm farm. According to the New Mexico State University‘s Chile Pepper Institute (the only international, non-profit scientific organization devoted to education and research related to Capsicum or chile peppers), the distinction of world’s most piquant pepper currently belongs to the Trinidad Moruga Scorpion.[7]
  • The Scorpions are so hot that, in order to cook with it, the pepper’s cultivators have to wear chemical masks and body suits, and reported feelings of numbness in their hands for more than two days afterwards. [8]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trinidad_Scorpion_Butch_T_pepper

  • Bird Pepper

Red-and-green-chilies

Pequin (or Piquin) pepper (pronunciation: pee/puh-KEEN) is a hot chile pepper cultivar commonly used as a spice. Taxonomically, it is classified within variety glabriusculum of the species Capsicum annuum.[1]

  • Pequin has a compact habit growing typically 0.3–0.6 meters tall, with bright green, ovate leaves and small fruits that rarely exceed 2 cm in length. Like most chiles, fruits start out green, ripening to brilliant red at maturity. Pequin peppers are very hot, often 13–40 times hotter than jalapeños on the Scoville scale (100,000–140,000 units). Flavor is described as citrusy, smoky (if dried with wood smoke), and nutty.[2]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pequin_pepper

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s